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Rafting in Manali

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White water Rafting on River Beas - Manali
The magic behind  River Rafting which is also referred, as White Water Rafting is the extreme and never-ending thrills in the untamed rivers. The rivers in the upper Himalayas are among the best in the world for river rafting sports, with many staircase rapids that challenge the body and spirit of the river runner. The river cuts against the rocky banks, crash into rocks, crevices and breaking into white water rapids, foaming, swirling, and falling in a thunderous din. We experienced the Thrill and Excitement of River Rafting om Beas River in Manali on 26th May 2008 White water river rafting is done at a place “PIRDI” , about 4kms from Kullu on the river Beas,which flows out of the molten Snow/Glaciers from the Himalayas & hence the water is icy-cold even in Summer.The stretch was of 14kms in total.
We Gruop of Eight , Four of them were Youngsters put on our safety accessories - Life jacket, Helmet . Our instructo…

A Visit To Rohtang Pass

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Rohtang Pass is situated about 51 km from Manali town at an altitude of 4,111 meters (13,400 ft.) on the highway to Keylong, is Rohtang Pass. Here one sees the majesty of the mountains at its height and splendour. In place of the pinnacled hills, sheltered valleys and cultivated tracts, the eye meets a range of precipitous cliffs, huge glaciers and piled Moraine, and deep ravines. Almost directly opposite is the well defined Sonepani glacier, slightly to the left are the twin peaks of the Geypang, jagged pyramids of rock, snow streaked and snow crowned.





Rohtang Pass is the highest point, 4,112m, on the Manali-Keylong road, 51-km from Manali town. It provides a wide panoramic view of mountains rising far above clouds, which is a sight truly breath-taking. It offers only limited skiing opportunities, but trekking possibilities are immense.
The …

Nature and We

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Nature manifest In many forms. Hinduism has always been an environmentally sensitive philosophy. No religion, perhaps, lays as much emphasis on environmental ethics as Hinduism. The Mahabharata, Ramayana, Vedas, Upanishads, BhagavadGita, Puranas and Smriti contain the earliest messages for preservation of environment and ecological balance. Nature, or Earth, has never been considered a hostile element to be conquered or dominated. In fact, man is forbidden from exploiting nature. He is taught to live in harmony with nature and recognize that divinity prevails in all elements, including plants and animals. The rishis of the past have always had a great respect for nature. Theirs was not a superstitious primitive theology. They perceived that all material manifestations are a shadow of the spiritual. The BhagavadGita advises us not to try to change the environment, improve it, or wrestle with it. If it seems hostile at times tolerate it. Ecology is an inherent part of a spiritual world…